How to open a bank account in Poland?

To open a bank account in Poland, you only need an identification document (ID). If you are not from an EU country, some banks could ask you for some residency proof. That can be a PESEL, the Polish national identification number. Ukrainians, for example, may need a PESEL to open a bank account in Poland.

If you need to open a bank account, we’ve created a tutorial that walks you through the procedure in simple steps.

How to open a bank account in Poland?

To open a bank account in Poland, you only need an identification document (ID). If you are not from an EU country, some banks could ask you for some residency proof.

Opening a bank account in Poland is simple. In some cases, banks will allow you to open one without having to visit a branch. You can use video identification. You can receive the final documents to sign by post. The post staff has the authority to verify your identity.

Many banks in Poland are part of worldwide conglomerates. Poland has a strong banking infrastructure. Banks provide a wide range of services and financial goods. They serve very different customers, from students to major enterprises. The network of cash machines in Poland is extensive.

You can do all fundamental transactions. Contactless payment was available in Poland before many other countries.

Almost every bank has a sophisticated mobile app and online banking. They have a variety of digital payment alternatives and mobile wallet compatibility.

Poland’s economy is expanding. It benefits from immigrants fleeing nations hit by economic crises and political strife. Many young and educated people work with international corporations in Poland.

What documents do I need to open a bank account in Poland?

Opening a bank account in Poland can be more difficult for non-residents. But many banks give the option of opening a bank account with only identity verification.

These are some documents that you might need to open a bank account in Poland:

  • A passport or a national identification card, or any photo ID,
  • An address and other contact details,
  • Employment history and bank statements may be useful if you want a credit card or overdraft.

If you are not from an EU country, some banks could ask you for some residency proof. That can be a PESEL, the Polish national identification number. Ukrainians, for example, may need a PESEL to open a bank account in Poland.

It is best to investigate with banks what are their individual requirements. Some banks only ask for proof of identity.

Bank charges and costs

It’s crucial to study the terms and conditions before opening a bank account in Poland. Pay attention to the fees and taxes associated with banking. You might pay fees for maintaining your bank account or using a credit or debit card.

In Poland, a small monthly fee, like 15 to 20 Zloty, is typical for using your account. Some accounts may be more appealing because they don’t charge this fee for the first six months or a year.

Other frequent fees include a flat rate for using a cash machine from a different bank. Consider whether this might apply to the account you have selected.

Some bank operations are free but some other operations can be more expensive.

For example, if you transfer money between accounts that use different currencies. That can be expensive. You pay a fee to conduct the transaction. And you pay an exchange rate that might not be favorable.


Source: Najlepszekonto plSantander pl

The cover image is somewhere in Szczecin, Poland. Photo by Daniel Leżuch on Unsplash